Sunday, April 16, 2017

What I've Been Reading Lately: Airplane Reads + Children's Books


One of the best things about reading-besides the actual reading-is the sense of accomplishment that one gets from finishing a book. Listening to an audio book doesn't give me that same sense of satisfaction that I get when I finish the final page and softly shut (or in some cases, slam!) the back cover.

Here's what I've been closing the back cover on lately:

Calico Bush, by Rachel Field - (I read a library copy with the original wood engravings, which was a far prettier cover than the one shown here.) In 1742, young Marguerite and her grandmother leave France on board a ship bound for a French Settlement in America. But disaster strikes aboard the ship and Marguerite finds herself working as a "bound-out" girl or indentured servant to a family headed to an isolated claim on the northern coast of Maine. I liked this book a lot but have unresolved feelings about the ending. If you've read this, let me know what you thought!

Bird Lake Moon, by Kevin Henkes - I really like Henke's picture books (Wemberly Worried and Chrysanthemum being my favorites), so when I discovered that he also wrote chapter books, I knew I needed to read them, too. I originally checked this out as a family read-aloud but ended up just reading it to myself. It deals with some pretty big themes, like divorce and the death of a sibling, but Henke does emotional stuff, and the big feelings that come with it, well.

Hidden Figures: 
The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race, by Margot Lee Shetterly - I haven't seen this movie yet, but it's on my must-see list, especially after reading the book. For anyone living under a rock, this is about the women who were "human computers" and who did the calculations that would send men into space. They were quietly making important advances at a time when society was still segregated and they had to deal with disparities like separate bathroom and lunch rooms. A fascinating and important read. (An interesting side note from the book: When Ghandi's personal doctor came to the US with him, he wasn't permitted to eat in the same restaurant as Ghandi because his skin was "too dark.") 

2 comments:

  1. The movie of Hidden Figures is excellent! (I'm sorry that they left out your interesting side note, but on the other hand I can't see where they would have fitted it in.) A somewhat similar story that you might like is The Dismissal of Miss Ruth Brown--here's my review.

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  2. I've heard multiple recommendations for Hidden Figures lately (obviously, with the movie just coming out it's getting press). I think I'll have to read that before I see the movie!

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